Dell Inspiron One 23 (2350) review

The Dell Inspiron One 23 (2350) is one of the few desktops that make sense with the touch-optimized Windows 8 operating system.
Photo of Dell Inspiron One 23 (2350)

The Dell Inspiron One 23 (2350) ($1,399.99 direct) brings high-end features like a dual-hinge height and tilt mechanism down from the Dell’s XPS line down to the more affordable model lines. It’s a good blend of design and performance, giving power users good benchmark numbers and full features for a price under $1,500. It has more useful features and a much better price than our last Editors’ Choice, so the Inspiron One 23 (2350) leapfrogs it and takes its place as our newest EC for midrange all-in-one desktops.

Design and Features
The Inspiron One 23 (2350) leverages some of the features pioneered by the Dell XPS One 27 Touch (2720). These mainly revolve around the dual hinge that both tilts and adjusts the height of the screen. Using the dual hinge, you can rest assured that you will find an optimal screen position whether you are seated in a vertical position, seated reclined, or even standing. The dual hinge also allows both a semi-horizontal tilted position with the screen close to you (for optimal touch screen use while seated), and a truly horizontal position (for when you need to share the screen with someone on the other side of a table). The dual hinge gives the Inspiron One 23 (2350) some more versatility than the Editors’ Choice for midrange all-in-one desktops, the Vizio 27-inch All-in-One Touch PC (CA27T-B1) ($1,549). Both designs are notable because the both the Inspiron One 23 (2350) and the Vizio CA27T-B1 have connectors and electronics in their bases, which is a departure from the conventional wisdom that all the connectors and electronics should be built into the screen.

The 23-inch display is a standard full HD 1,920-by-1,080 resolution and offers 10-point touch capability. It’s very responsive, though we’d still recommend using the included wireless keyboard and mouse for extended typing sessions. The screen was solid during touch operations in most vertical and near vertical angles. However, when put into a fully horizontal position, there was some screen bounce during touch operations. Not enough to be a deal-breaker, but something to be aware of.

The base has the system’s I/O ports and electronics, which lets Dell put in a very thin screen. The screen has a similar thin side profile like the Apple iMac 21.5-Inch (Late 2012) ($1,299), though the iMac has its electronics built into the screen. The Inspiron One 23 (2350) has four USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, a SD card reader, and HDMI-in and -out ports built into its base. The USB ports are notable, because the USB 3.0 ports are the same black color as the USB 2.0 ports in the back. This can lead to confusion if you don’t note the USB-SS logos next to the faster USB 3.0 ports. On the other hand, the HDMI-in and -out ports are a great addition, since they let you either utilize multi-monitor capabilities or use the Inspiron One 23 (2350)’s built in monitor with future PCs or even set top boxes and console games.

The Inspiron One 23 (2350) comes with very few pre-loaded apps. We saw Amazon, Kindle, eBay, Skype, and Office (Trial) on the Start screen. We encourage the system manufacturers to limit pre-loaded apps, and only the Microsoft Signature-prepared Vizio CA27T-B1 can beat it. The Vizio also beats the Inspiron One 23 (2350) in it aural range. While the speakers in the Inspiron One 23 (2350)’s base are clear, they are somewhat anemic compared to the Vizio, which comes with a subwoofer. The system seemed to have a soft volume level, even though we turned all the volume controls all the way up. You’d better plan for using headphones or external speakers with the Inspiron One 23 (2350).

Performance

The Inspiron One 23 (2350) comes with an Intel Core i7-4700MQ processor, AMD Radeon HD 8690A discrete graphics, and a 1TB 7,200rpm SATA hard drive with 32GB SSD supplemental cache. This combo gave the Inspiron One 23 (2350) class-leading performance at the PCMark 7 test (5,398 points), which measures the system’s day-to-day performance like booting the system, opening and using apps, and copying files. It scored well in the other tests, though in the same range as the other systems like the Vizio CA27T-B1 on the multimedia tests like Photoshop CS6 and Handbrake.

The 3D tests were good, if not spectacular. The Inspiron One 23 (2350)’s discrete AMD Radeon HD graphics gives it a bit more 3D performance than the Vizio CA27T-B1, but it’s nowhere near the high-end gaming performance found on the iMac and the Dell’s big brother XPS 27 Touch. Suffice to say that the Inspiron One 23 (2350) has the chops to last you at least five to seven years before it starts to feel slow.

The Dell Inspiron One 23 (2350) has very good performance, decent styling, and brings the XPS line’s dual hinge screen down to a more affordable all-in-one desktop. It’s also two hundred dollars cheaper than the Vizio CA27T-B1, with more performance and features like HDMI-out, more system memory, and discrete 3D graphics. The midrange all-in-one desktop arena is more of a game of leapfrog than a homerun derby. In this case, the Inspiron One 23 (2350) leaps past the Vizio CA27T-B1 to become our new highly recommended Editors’ Choice for midrange all-in one desktop PCs.

Specifications
Touchscreen Yes
Processor Family Intel Core i7
Storage Type HDD, SSD
Graphics Card AMD Radeon HD 8890A
Screen Size 23 inches
Monitor Type LED Widescreen
RAM 12 GB
Type All-in-one, Touchscreen All-In-One
Storage Capacity (as Tested) 1000 GB
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8

Verdict
Dell gives the Inspiron One 23 (2350) a dual-hinge design that lets users comfortably use the system in an extensive range of seated and standing positions.
Published under license from Ziff Davis, Inc., New York, All rights reserved.
Copyright © 2012 Ziff Davis, Inc