Disk Falcon by Sad Cat Software review

Disk analyser with sci-fi styling.
Photo of Disk Falcon by Sad Cat Software
$9.99 via download

Working out what’s on your Mac’s hard disk and where all the space has gone isn’t supposed to be fun. It’s the kind of “I-suppose-I-really-ought-to-do-it” job that gets routinely relegated to the bottom of the pile – until things start getting clogged up and you realise you’re running out of space. Sad Cat Software’s Disk Falcon is an attempt to inject a bit of pizzazz into this important but routine part of Macintosh maintenance so that you look forward to doing it, rather than spending all your time putting it off.

Futuristic interface
The utility’s trick is in its interface, which uses the same underlying engine that powers the company’s popular game, Ultraviolet Dawn. So, instead of stodgy Excel-style pie charts, dialogue boxes full of arcane settings and standard progress bars indicating available storage space, you get the kind of futuristic heads-up display that would look right at home in The Last Starfighter (think plucky effort on a budget, rather than absolute blow-you-away-state-of-the-art sci-fi).

You can scan individual folders or disk volumes by dragging them into the main window at which point everything kicks off – scanning wheels spin, bar charts rise and fall. Pie charts rotate, divide and expand as each section is scanned. Once the results are in, you can drill down to specific sub-folders or search for file types, identify the bloaters and drop them into the Bin for deletion.

Company: Sad Cat Software

Positives
  • Sci-fi styling, sense of fun.
Negative
  • Limited features, confusing results.

Verdict

Disk Falcon is fun - no doubt about that - and the animations and vocal effects ("Scanning started") may encourage you to take more notice of what's going on inside your hard drive than you did before, but the results are a bit opaque, the functionality limited (even for something that only costs $9.99), and you're probably better off considering something a little more conventional like Daisy Disk.